Tess Sharpe

Contemporary YA Writer. Pro Baker (on hiatus). My debut, FAR FROM YOU (Hyperion US/Indigo UK) is out now! I write about murder, love and other doomed things. I blog pugs, pyrenees, st. bernards, food, YA fiction, classic cinema, women's and queer rights and other fun stuff.

theflightofthephoenix:

justinaireland:

rosalarian:

When I say people want to see more diversity in stories, no, I really don’t mean different stories about straight white dudes. I really, really don’t mean that at all. This isn’t about types of stories being told. This is specifically about people. I’m not letting you make this about something else. You are not hijacking this message to make sure we’re still talking about straight white dudes.

You, sirs, are part of the problem. *stink eye*

LOVE THIS!

(via seananmcguire)

My finished UK copies came! They look so lovely. I’m obsessed with the inside flaps.

My finished UK copies came! They look so lovely. I’m obsessed with the inside flaps.

ami-angelwings:

badass-bharat-deafmuslimpunkstar:

An Indian woman, a Japanese woman, and a Syrian woman, all training to be doctors at Women’s Medical College of Philadelphia, 1880s. (Image courtesy Legacy Center, Drexel University College of Medicine Archives, Philadelphia, PA. Image #p0103) (x)

The Indian woman, Dr. Anandi Gopal Joshi, was the first Indian woman to earn a degree in Western medicine, and also believed to be the first Hindu woman to set foot on American soil.
The Japanese woman, Dr. Kei Okami, was the first Japanese woman to obtain a degree in Western Medicine.
The Syrian woman is Dr. Sabat Islambooly.  Her name is spelled incorrectly on that photograph. 
For those interested, here’s more information on other women of color who attended and graduated from Women’s Medical College of Philadelphia in the past, with a focus on the Japanese-American women they accepted during the US WW2 internment of Japanese-Americans.

ami-angelwings:

badass-bharat-deafmuslimpunkstar:

An Indian woman, a Japanese woman, and a Syrian woman, all training to be doctors at Women’s Medical College of Philadelphia, 1880s. (Image courtesy Legacy Center, Drexel University College of Medicine Archives, Philadelphia, PA. Image #p0103) (x)

The Indian woman, Dr. Anandi Gopal Joshi, was the first Indian woman to earn a degree in Western medicine, and also believed to be the first Hindu woman to set foot on American soil.

The Japanese woman, Dr. Kei Okami, was the first Japanese woman to obtain a degree in Western Medicine.

The Syrian woman is Dr. Sabat Islambooly.  Her name is spelled incorrectly on that photograph. 

For those interested, here’s more information on other women of color who attended and graduated from Women’s Medical College of Philadelphia in the past, with a focus on the Japanese-American women they accepted during the US WW2 internment of Japanese-Americans.

(Source: badass-bharat-deafmuslim-artista, via thebicker)

In my seventeen years as a bookseller and three years as a school librarian before that, if there’s one thing I have noticed, it’s that we adults make all kinds of erroneous assumptions about what will and won’t interest children. Time and time again, at the bookstore and at children’s book festivals, I have observed white children picking up books with kids of color on the cover, and heard adults express surprise at the choice. “Are you sure you want that one?” they’ll ask. Or, “Wouldn’t you like this book instead?” It’s not the kids who are the problem. Kids really, really, really only care about a great story. In twenty years of connecting children with books they love, I have only seen one child—ONE!—balk at a book cover because the main character was a different race from her own. It’s the adults who underestimate a child’s ability or desire to see beyond race.

The good news is that those same adults will usually respond well to bookseller enthusiasm for titles and allow their own reservations (which they aren’t even consciously aware of) to be shifted.

Great advice from Elizabeth Bluemle, co-owner of the Flying Pig Bookstore in Shelburne, VT. For more great advice on how to book-talk diverse titles to customers and patrons (this applies to libraries, too!), see the full article: True or False? Multicultural Books Don’t Sell (We Are the Problem, We Are the Solution). (via tubooks)

YES YES A THOUSAND TIMES YES.

(via bearhugsbeerhugs)

(via bearhugsbeerhugs)

This is not a review of Captain America: Winter Soldier

inkytasty:

Because you probably don’t need another one. Though I will say I enjoyed the film a lot, and Ed (Brubaker) was amazing! I waved at him and felt super proud.

But this is not a review of that film.

Before the film, as is customary, we watched trailers (Omg how good does guardians of the galaxy…

onefourkidlit:

A starred Kirkus review for OneFour Kidlit author Corinne Duyvis!
“Duyvis smoothly transitions between the two main characters’ thoughts and emotions while realistically conveying the individual alienation and terror of two very different people. Rich worldbuilding, convincing nonheteronormative relationships, balanced class issues, and nuanced, ethnically diverse characters add to the novel’s depth. The well-paced action builds toward an unexpected, thrilling conclusion that will leave readers eager for more from this promising new author. Original and compelling; a stunning debut.” (via OTHERBOUND by Corinne Duyvis | Kirkus)

onefourkidlit:

A starred Kirkus review for OneFour Kidlit author Corinne Duyvis!

“Duyvis smoothly transitions between the two main characters’ thoughts and emotions while realistically conveying the individual alienation and terror of two very different people. Rich worldbuilding, convincing nonheteronormative relationships, balanced class issues, and nuanced, ethnically diverse characters add to the novel’s depth. The well-paced action builds toward an unexpected, thrilling conclusion that will leave readers eager for more from this promising new author. Original and compelling; a stunning debut.”

(via OTHERBOUND by Corinne Duyvis | Kirkus)